Review: Fate/Zero (Masters & Servants, Part 3)

Fate/Zero:
Light Novels: Gen Urobuchi with illustrations by Takashi Takeuchi, 2006-2007. Translations written by Baka-Tsuki
(http://baka-tsuki.org/project/index.php?title=Fate/Zero).
Anime. Aniplex, 2013.

I’ve withheld myself from reviewing some of the Master/Servant partnerships until now for the very simple reason of them being fairly uninteresting (my opinion, not others) or not really relevant in my conversation/analysis of gender. However, the Masters and Servant I’ve chosen to analyze today are probably a great deal of the crux of any analysis of the series, not just because of their roles in the series (and beyond) but because of their interesting personalities and traits.

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Kayneth El-Melloi Archibald, Sola-Ui Nuaba-Re Sophia-Ri and Lancer (Diarmuid of the love spot)

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Review: Fate/Zero (Masters & Servants, Part 2)

Fate/Zero:
Light Novels: Gen Urobuchi with illustrations by Takashi Takeuchi, 2006-2007. Translations written by Baka-Tsuki
(http://baka-tsuki.org/project/index.php?title=Fate/Zero).
Anime. Aniplex, 2013.

Master/Servant Tokiomi Tohsaka and Archer (Gilgamesh)

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Review: Fate/Zero (Part 1)

Fate/Zero:
Light Novels: Gen Urobuchi with illustrations by Takashi Takeuchi, 2006-2007. Translations written by Baka-Tsuki
(http://baka-tsuki.org/project/index.php?title=Fate/Zero).
Anime. Aniplex, 2013.

To preface this review, I’d like to point out that the written light novels and anime were both original works; neither were based on any sort of visual novel (like Fate/Stay Night). While the mythos from Fate/Stay is used as a basis for what happens, the Fourth Holy Grail War is an original concept, with many backstories and information not originally conceptualized in the visual novel, anime, or graphic novel series of Fate/Stay Night. I do plan on reviewing Fate/Stay Night at some point, but I felt like reviewing this timeframe/universe first.

That being said, this series – both the light novel and the anime – are fantastic examples of a gender-balanced world building. Between the intellectually, but physically weak Waver Velvet, the deadly markswoman Maiya, and the gender-neutral Saber, the world based on Urobuchi’s light novels is a great example of people being people rather than forced into particular gender roles. My plan to deconstruct the series is probably more than I can chew, to be honest, so what I’ll do is split up parts of it, probably based on characters.

Master/Servant Waver Velvet & Rider (Alexander the Great)

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